Hello. My name is Dianne. I am a recovering Facebookaholic. Like many women, I was drawn to the fascination and ease of the networking phenomenon of Facebook.

Hello. My name is Dianne. I am a recovering Facebookaholic. Like many women, I was drawn to the fascination and ease of the networking phenomenon of Facebook.


I also found myself relying on texting as my primary venue of communication with family and friends.


I have been away from Facebook for almost a month now, and have also been without my cell phone for just as long.


No, it is not easy, but, yes, it is refreshing. It’s like a vacation from technology.


Admittedly, I was jonesing for the frequent status update or cell text at the beginning of my technology hiatus.


It did get easier. An eerie sense of freedom develops as you look up a phone number and call someone from a land line (if you still have one), or visit an acquaintance.


I even mailed some letters with an old-fashioned stamp. And I can still track down my kids as if I have a built-in GPS unit.


Although “The Social Network” movie might be raking in box-office bucks, for me this thing called Facebook is dying. There is something to be said about speaking face-to-face with someone.


The effort is there and the interconnectivity is truly a priceless experience.


There are no false assumptions based on a non-response and nothing can quite match a real-life smile as opposed to a computer-generated smiley-face icon.


Social networking has eased the availability of personal information for the masses. Be aware that what you share once may exist long after you hit the delete button.


Dianne McDonald is a working mother who lives in Marshfield, Mass., with her husband and five kids.