Statehood Day celebrated Aug. 10 at First Missouri State Capitol State Historic Site

Celebrate the 196th birthday of Missouri becoming a state at an open house Aug. 10 at First Missouri State Capitol State Historic Site in St. Charles. The free festivities will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and open to the public.

The public is invited to tour the buildings where Missouri’s first legislators met from 1821-1826 to establish guidelines for operating as a new state. Guests will learn about the road to statehood while visiting with site interpreters, watching demonstrations and enjoying free cake and lemonade.

Missouri State Parks is celebrating 100 years in 2017. Visitors can experience all the park system has to offer with the Centennial Passport. Visit http://mostateparks.com/passport for more information.

 

Bat program offered Aug. 12 at Echo Bluff State Park

A free program about the benefits of bats will be presented Aug. 12 at Echo Bluff State Park south of Salem. The program will be from 8 to 10 p.m. and is open to the public.

Kirsten Alvey-Mudd with the Missouri Bat Census will explain how bats are beneficial to the environment. Mist nets will be set up for catching and processing bats. An infer red camera will be set up over the pond for viewing the bats as they feed. Equipment will be available for listening to the bats as they use echo-location to search for food. Wear good shoes and bring a light with a red filter if possible.

Echo Bluff State Park is located on Hwy. 19 approximately 25 miles south of Salem and 14 miles north of Eminence. For more information about the event, call the park at 573-751-1224. For more information on state parks and historic sites, visit http://mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. 

 

Boone’s Lick Trail discussed Aug. 17 at First Missouri State Capitol State Historic Site

Guests will be introduced to the Boone’s Lick Trail at a talk Aug. 17 at First Missouri State Capitol State Historic Site in St. Charles. The lecture will be held at 8 p.m. at the historic site and the public is invited.

The Boone’s Lick Trail was considered an important westward migration route after the War of 1812. Attendees will learn why the trail was important, what it was like to travel the trail and famous people who used the trail to journey west. The presentation will be given by Jack Hartwig, the site’s interpreter, who has retraced the entire Boone’s Lick Trail and led other historians on the same journey.

The lecture is part of a monthly speaker series sponsored by the Friends of First Missouri State Capitol. A $10 donation is suggested.