The senior basketball player always wanted to be like her father, Jim, who once played the game himself and even surpass what he accomplished on the court. Whatever the scenario was, like shooting after practices, she made it her mission to outplay her rival and she recently accomplished a feat only she could claim when she scored the 1,000th point of her high school career.

Osage senior Carson Wood may finally have the upper hand on dad.

The senior basketball player always wanted to be like her father, Jim, who once played the game himself and even surpass what he accomplished on the court. Whatever the scenario was, like shooting after practices, she made it her mission to outplay her rival and she recently accomplished a feat only she could claim when she scored the 1,000th point of her high school career.

“He was actually pretty good,” Wood said with a smile of her lifelong competitor whom Wood noted the milestone would not be possible without. “It was one of those things when you are little where you want to grow up and be just like your parents so I wanted to be like him. As I got older, I just wanted to be better than him and this is something he has not done so it was a good feeling.”

Wood’s signature basket came during a game against Richland on January 17. The senior said the milestone would not be possible without him and noted that was just as true of her teammates who put her into a position to be successful.

“I have really good teammates because it is one of those things where you cannot score that many points without good teammates and I’ve been blessed to have amazing teammates the past four years,” she said.

Fellow Osage senior Kerrigan Gamm hit the mark earlier this season and Wood became the fifth Indian to join the prestigious 1,000-point club and third in the past four years after 2015 graduate Izzy Morris. Jordyn Bartlett, a 2017 Osage graduate, was just 45 points away.

“It is really awesome because there are not that many girls that do it so to be able to accomplish that is a really amazing feeling,” the senior stated. “The fact that I could do it with Kerrigan too and have two in one season, it is really cool and you do not see that a lot.”

Osage coach Scott Rowland agrees and does not take that fact for granted. However, he was also not surprised that it did with the way the two compliment each other and their teammates.

“It is a really good pairing to have as the leaders of a team. Even last year as juniors, both stepped into a leadership role on and off the floor and this season they have really made that a focus,” he said. “They have played with this group for a long time and the other girls know what Carson and Kerrigan bring to the game. Conversely, the fact that the two of them know their teammates so well makes the whole team more successful as they are able to help get their teammates in a position to be their best.”

And that is precisely the key. The coach said hitting the milestones were enjoyable moments for the senior duo, but it was never a goal or focus as the thing that mattered most was simply winning games no matter who got the credit or what the situation was. To even have a chance to reach that point and join the club, though, Rowland said it takes a village.

“I think it is a testament to the whole program. It starts with the youth coaches who give so much of their time and never get their name in the paper,” the coach remarked. “The middle school coaches (Amy McDonald and Chris Gump) continue to work with all the players and give of themselves to make the players that much better. There are great assistants up here (Mandi Evans and David Gamm) who continue that work and refine those skills for every player in the program, not just the 1,000-point scorers.

“Most importantly, it is about the girls. Not everyone gets to score 1,000 or maybe even 500, but they have done a great job of buying into being a vital cog in the success that the girls have earned,” the coach continued. It takes a team or group of talented people to help them all earn individual and team success. Truthfully, I can’t think of anyone anywhere who is more blessed than I have been to have such talented and high-character girls.”

For Rowland, Wood is certainly no exception as a vital cog for the program the past four years. Whether it is her ability to drive to the basket, shoot a 3-pointer from the outside and everything in between, lead the team in free throw percentage at 74 percent or lead the team in assists, the benefits of having a player like Wood have continued to multiply.

“I think that the biggest difference I see between Carson her first two years and her last two years is how much better her shot selection is,” the coach noted. “I don’t feel like she forces anything and the shots she takes are always good ones. The biggest change, though, is in her leadership. She is a constant encourager in practice and games and never gets frustrated with her teammates. Her voice is the one that is heard most often after mine coming out of timeouts and on the floor and that is a good thing for our team.”

Wood said it has all simply come from a place of desire, just like the days of trying to outshoot her dad, and good things have happened during that span as well. Most notably, the program has reached the state quarterfinals two years in a row.

“You just have to work and have to want to be here and give your all at all times,” she pointed out. “My teammates and I do a very good job of that and that is how we’ve been so successful over the past few years. That is the big key.”

Scoring 1,000 points was just icing on the cake.